Tag Archives: bespoke suit london

He’s got the Blues….

A blue jacket is born

By Charlie. Tuesday 21st May 2019.

It has been a busy few weeks at Henry Herbert Tailors. One of our Apprentices, Lucy, is studying at Newham College. She spends three days a week with us, shadowing one of our Master Tailors and taking guidance from him for works that he asks her to complete. She wanted to buy her first pair of cutting shears and she asked us which would be most suitable for her. With shears, the sky is the limit when it comes to how much you want to spend and so we advised her to spend little and try a 12″ pair and see how she goes. In fact, we treated her to a new pair and hopefully, one day she will come along and tell us what her experience of the shears are and how they might be improved. Our main advice, from Francesco, one of our Master Tailors – was “go heavy!” And from Abdul, our other Master Tailor, “go easy” – i.e. ones that won’t ruin your thumb when holding them. We will see.

AMONGST all of this, we have been making a full bespoke blue herringbone wool jacket for a customer. The customer in fact lives in China and comes back occasionally when he can for the fittings. This is the story of his jacket, over a few weeks.

It is always handy to have a French curve and a few other tools at hand when starting out.

And the trimmings required – in the picture below the collar canvass and the body canvass from Bernstein & Banleys.

Once everything was prepared, a paper pattern was made – this is called ‘striking’.

 

Once the pattern was made, the pattern could be cut – below is a front body panel and a sleeve.

We then use some old fashioned weights to put the pattern on top of the fabric, to keep everything in place.

And you can see things taking shape….

The different parts of the jacket can then be cut.

 

Once the pattern has been transferred to the fabric, it can then be ‘basted’ together using basting cotton.

Thereby begins the very first pressing stage. We used a 5kg pressing iron. We would love to find something a bit heavier, but they are hard to find.

And below is the first part of the jacket coming together.

Several weeks later, we had the forward and last fitting below. I will make another post about these stages at a later date as it is a story in itself.

And straight away, we were on to starting the process all over again – this time with a blue cotton fabric from Loro Piana.

As always, if you have any questions or thoughts, just mention them below or email them to me at charlie@henryherbert.com.

 

 

 

Men’s Fragrances

Bespoke tailoring instantly conjures up an image that suggests sophistication and style. Whether you’re wearing a classic handmade dinner suit tuxedo or distinctive traditional inspired three-piece suit it goes without saying that you’ll require the essential accessories to perfectly finish off the ensemble. This includes scent.

Limited Edition

The way a man smells lingers on the mind of every woman (and man) who gets a tantalising whiff of the exquisite and expensive aroma. Many fashion houses have their own unique formulas that are beautifully packaged up and introduced as an entry level purchase option for individuals wanting to flaunt style at an affordable price.
Whilst most fragrance brands look to hook potential buyers with limited edition scents that are pocket friendly, one Italian tailoring house has opted to create a buzz for another reason. Brioni’s self-titled, limited-run fragrance has a hefty £215 price tag! The buttery cognac coloured fragrance is packaged in a chunky, squat and square sculptured bottle that complements the label’s range of accessories and furniture.

Brioni’s aim was to package expensive so that it looks like it smells. Brioni features 100 notes that combine to create a dominating rich fragrance that highlights zingy citrus, smoky tones, musk, saffron, Sicilian lemon, leather and cashmere. In essence, it is designed to smell like the classic bespoke suit.
The Smell of Success

For men who aspire to look, and smell, the business careful consideration must be given to the finishing touches. Prestigious fragrance houses specialise in creating personalised bespoke scent that reflects personality, elegance and individual style. Master perfumer Oliver Creed creates “the favoured scent of the world’s most powerful, refined and attractive gentlemen.” His fragrances are bottled up and bought by the Hollywood A-List with a price tag to match – a bespoke formula can set you back a cool £10,000.

Creed’s fragrances are made with natural products that are by definition expensive. Incorporating synthetic products enables him to create a range that is a lower-grade version, without compromising too much on quality. Mass production is not on the agenda.

Aroma Appeal

Fragrance is a powerful tool that can alter mood and influence image instantly. Bespoke tailoring complements elegant sensory blends that create olfactory magnificence. In the same way you wouldn’t spoil the effect of a sophisticated handmade suit by wearing a crumpled shirt and scuffed shoes, your fragrance choice reflects the overall image and style that you wish to create. Perfectly matching fragrance to fashion has long been the pursuit of the rich, powerful and famous and bespoke garments provide the ideal introduction to upgrading your scent palette and collection.

Top 5 Expensive Fragrances

• The most expensive bottle of men’s fragrance in the world is Clive Christian No.1 Perfume for Men – retailing at £1,528.

Clive Christian No.1 – Imperial Majesty Edition Perfume is packaged in a customised bottle and priced $215.00 (or £140,000). His regular edition fragrances are a more reasonable $865 (£562).

Tom Ford has a range of sophisticated Eau de Parfums in the £142-£330 price pocket.

• If you prefer a citrus based fragrance try Annick Goutal’s Eau D’Hadrien, which supposedly smells like the Tuscan sun and costs a few quid short of £1,000.

• If you’re happy to share your unisex fragrance Caron’s Poivre has been around since 1954 and still shifts units despite the $2,000 (£1,300) tag.

Tailor Talk

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TAILOR TALK – A professional tailor might seem to speak a strange language at first –  the language bespoke. But most importantly he, or she, should make you feel at ease and to ask any question you wish. If you are not sure of something, just ask! Bespoke simply means made to your individual and specific pattern. The handmade tailored suit is therefore a one-of-a-kind garment that is created to make you look your very best. Understanding how best to convey your needs ensures that the tailor is able to translate your imagination into the perfect bespoke creation.

A bespoke suit speaks volumes about the wearer’s personality, character and style. Set your own trend by taking inspiration from style conscious leaders and influencers that you admire. Choose classic Saville Row style for a bespoke suit with timeless appeal or opt for contemporary simplicity with James Bond inspired elegance. Use visual references to ensure your tailor knows exactly what you want to achieve. Find a tailor who speaks your language to ensure he makes a bespoke suit that is made from a hand-drawn paper pattern to your exact body measurements.

Specialist tailors have mastered specific structuring techniques that create distinctive styles of tailoring. Whether your preference is traditional British or modern continental it is essential that you find a tailor with a complementary house style. You will feel more comfortable and relaxed with a tailor who specialises in your preferred garment style than one who has a long list of celebrity clients but doesn’t make the kind of suit you want to wear.

The tape measure never lies! No matter how you think you look the tailor will take multiple accurate measurements to capture your natural shape, size and posture. There is therefore no use in sucking in your belly when the tape measure winds around your waist. Allow the tailor to measure up so that the suit can be adjusted to compensate for specific features that you’re not comfortable with.

When visiting a tailor it is important to present the bigger picture. This means openly discussing your specific needs and requirements, along with suit purpose. When you’re being measured up you should therefore attend the appointment in suitable clothing that gives the tailor an opportunity to evaluate your unique shape and size. Wear a favourite suit and dress shoes to demonstrate how you naturally carry the garments.

When choosing a bespoke suit it is best to opt for a handmade suit that flatters your shape and size without being overly flamboyant in design. Save the quirky personal touches for the details. Add bold and luxurious silk lining to the jacket, elongate or widen the lapel and finish off with smart symmetrical buttons on the jacket sleeves. For a perfect silhouette choose a double vent.

A bespoke suit is made to your unique body shape and should therefore fit you perfectly. This means that you’ll have no need for belt loops on the trousers. Choose adjustable side tabs, with buttons, for added comfort and a streamlined look.

Take your time over any decision regarding fabric, colour, fit, style and cost. After all you want to be completely satisfied with your bespoke suit so use the multiple fittings as an opportunity to double check details. By the third fitting your suit should be practically ready to wear. Once your handmade suit is ready to wear your personal specifications will be stored in the tailor’s file, for your next appointment.

The Myth & Legend of T.E. Lawrence

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THERE are many myths about T.E Lawrence. The flamboyant and controversial character that is classically portrayed by Peter O’Toole in David Lean’s film Lawrence Of Arabia was based on a British Military figure of below average height. Thomas Edward Lawrence may have been small in stature but his memory and legacy are of epic proportions.

Standing just 5’5″ tall Lawrence was very conscious of his stature and resolved to strengthen his physique and character to compensate for his lack of physical presence. The illegitimate son of Sir Thomas Robert Tighe Chapman, Lawrence was initially turned down by the army because he was too small. He would however go on to make a huge impact in the First World War. He is primarily remembered as being the British Army officer renowned for his liaison role during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign, and the Arab Revolt against Ottoman Turkish rule of 1916–18.

Personal Style

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As an officer in the British Army, Lawrence was considered scruffy and quickly earned himself the title of the ‘untidiest officer in the British Army’. His sloppy style meant that his uniform was never worn with the required amount of reverence. Instead his lack of respect for authority was openly displayed in his careless dressing. Finer details like the loose buckling of his belt, or an unbuttoned shoulder strap, allowed him to demonstrate his individuality and unorthodox approach.

Whilst a dapper bespoke suit would have immediately given his small stature defined presence Lawrence relied on his broad mind to give him the edge over his peers. He embraced other languages, culture and people and developed a keen interest in archaeology. During archeology trips to the Middle East, Lawrence would immerse himself in all aspects of Arabic culture. He would also wear native costume to identify himself with the locals and their customs. Bedouin dress of flowing robes, headdress and bare feet was the normal dress code.

Romantic Hero

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Lawrence had a clean-living lifestyle that included complete abstinence from the consumption of meat, alcohol and tobacco. He is the classic romantic military hero. Although his deeds during World War I were highlighted by war correspondents, it wasn’t until 1919 that the British liaison officer became a media celebrity. With a bounty on his head the British Army made efforts to suppress his distinctive image in order to protect him from being recognised by the Turkish troops.

Hiding his now legendary status by changing his name to John Hume Ross, Lawrence joined the ranks of the Royal Air Force, but was found out and enlisted in the Tank Corps as Thomas Edward Shaw, the name that he used until the day he died. Lawrence was a prolific writer and his published works, including The Seven Pillars of Wisdom, were attributed to Lawrence. He died in an road accident, aged 46, whilst driving one of his beloved motorcycles at maximum speed.

Today’s romantic heroes may opt for a more traditional style of bespoke tailoring. Whilst he is mostly remembered via Lawrence of Arabia’s cinematic portrayal, T.E. Lawrence clearly had his own unique sense of bespoke style. Replacing the classic bespoke suit with a flowing white Bedoiun robe Lawrence displayed his true personality and flamboyant elegance, and demonstrated that you don’t have to be tall to stand head and shoulders above everyone else.

The Tailor’s Table – Revealed!

What’s on a tailor’s table?! Pictured is Charlie – the creator of Henry Herbert Tailors – at his Savile Row desk. It is not the tidiest desk in the world, but it has all the tools he needs to go through an order with each customer – tape measures, pins, chalk, books (and books) of fabrics and an order form. Henry Herbert is a scootering tailor service, using our fleet of Piaggio scooters to meet customers wherever and whenever is good for them. Or they can meet us, by appointment on Savile Row. To Book a Tailor, just click here.